Bloodless Surgery Program

One of our goal is to serve the healthcare needs of our community. We come into contact daily with people whose culture, religion, and ideas prohibit accepting blood transfusion. We have developed Bloodless Surgery program to fulfill this goal by reaching out to a community which has been wary of hospitals and physicians.

The basic tenet of the Bloodless Surgery Program is that a patient's wishes and decision to not receive any Blood or Blood products be respected. The justification for the refusal of blood transfusions by the Jehovah's Witness community is based on a literal interpretation of several Biblical passages, such as "Only flesh with its soul-its blood-you must not eat" (Genesis 9:4) or "No soul of you must eat blood" (Leviticus 17:12). Our foregut and HPB surgery team with Dr. Sukharamwala performs operations on virtually all his patients very meticulously to ensure precise surgical technique and meticulous hemostasis and hence Blood transfusion is avoided. The planning must start way early on when the decision to operate is made.He works and monitors the program with his team including pulmonologists, hematologists, intensivists, and the anesthesiologist. The whole team is aware of the special needs of these patients Dr. Sukharamwala oversees the care of Jehovah’s patient directly and is available at all times to help coordinate the care of any Jehovah's Witness patient who requires an integrated team approach to his or her medical care. Nursing and ancillary staff are educated regarding the program so as to ensure seamless transition between all areas of the hospital.

Blood lost in surgery can often be salvaged through the use of machines called blood processors or, more typically, "cell savers." When the salvaged blood is connected in circuit with the patient and not primed with blood products, the use of these devices becomes a "matter of individual conscience" for each patient to decide. Salvaged blood, along with surgical debris, is aspirated from the surgical field into the processing bowl, where it is washed and centrifuged for effective cleaning of the blood for immediate reinfusion in an uninterrupted flow to the body.

Pre-operative anaemia requires appropriate investigation, with suitable supplementation of iron, folate and vitamin B12. Even in the absence of anaemia, Epoetin (human recombinant erythropoietin) can be used to improve red cell mass.

You can expect to have a coordinated team approach, across all phases of peri-operative care to ensure that you have a safe, successful outcome after your operation without requiring any blood or blood products.

Our Program

One of our goal is to serve the healthcare needs of our community. We come into contact daily with people whose culture, religion, and ideas prohibit accepting blood transfusion. We have developed Bloodless Surgery program to fulfill this goal by reaching out to a community which has been wary of hospitals and physicians.

The basic tenet of the Bloodless Surgery Program is that a patient's wishes and decision to not receive any Blood or Blood products be respected. The justification for the refusal of blood transfusions by the Jehovah's Witness community is based on a literal interpretation of several Biblical passages, such as "Only flesh with its soul-its blood-you must not eat" (Genesis 9:4) or "No soul of you must eat blood" (Leviticus 17:12). Our foregut and HPB surgery team with Dr. Sukharamwala performs operations on virtually all his patients very meticulously to ensure precise surgical technique and meticulous hemostasis and hence Blood transfusion is avoided. The planning must start way early on when the decision to operate is made.He works and monitors the program with his team including pulmonologists, hematologists, intensivists, and the anesthesiologist. The whole team is aware of the special needs of these patients Dr. Sukharamwala oversees the care of Jehovah’s patient directly and is available at all times to help coordinate the care of any Jehovah's Witness patient who requires an integrated team approach to his or her medical care. Nursing and ancillary staff are educated regarding the program so as to ensure seamless transition between all areas of the hospital.

Procedure

Blood lost in surgery can often be salvaged through the use of machines called blood processors or, more typically, "cell savers." When the salvaged blood is connected in circuit with the patient and not primed with blood products, the use of these devices becomes a "matter of individual conscience" for each patient to decide. Salvaged blood, along with surgical debris, is aspirated from the surgical field into the processing bowl, where it is washed and centrifuged for effective cleaning of the blood for immediate reinfusion in an uninterrupted flow to the body.

Pre-operative anaemia requires appropriate investigation, with suitable supplementation of iron, folate and vitamin B12. Even in the absence of anaemia, Epoetin (human recombinant erythropoietin) can be used to improve red cell mass.

You can expect to have a coordinated team approach, across all phases of peri-operative care to ensure that you have a safe, successful outcome after your operation without requiring any blood or blood products.