Gastric cancer

Gastric cancer occurs in the stomach. It is one of the very aggressive cancer and arises from the lining of the stomach. If diagnosed in early stage, this cancer has good prognosis. However at a later stage, the prognosis is poor.

Symptoms of stomach cancer:-

In the early stages, indigestion, nausea, feeling bloated, poor appetite are the vague symptoms. These symptoms mimick common diseases of the stomach like ulcer disease, reflux or gallbladder stones. As the result, these symptoms may be ignored by the patient for a long time and may not seek medical attention.. As the cancer grows and may spread, patients may develop symptoms like abdominal pain unrelieved by pain medications, black stools or bright bleeding noticed in the stool, vomiting blood ( hemetemesis), weight loss, fatigues relatred to anemia.

Besides consultation with our Surgeons, gastroenterologist, following are the list of tests which may help with the diagnosis of the gastric cancer.

  • Blood tests, including blood chemistry (which looks for disease-causing substances in the blood) and complete blood count (to determine the number of red blood cells)

  • Upper GI series. These are X-rays of the esophagus and stomach (the upper gastrointestinal, or GI tract), taken after the patient drinks a barium solution. The barium outlines the stomach on the X-ray, helping the doctor find tumors or other abnormal areas.

  • Fecal occult blood test to look for blood in the stool

  • Gastroscopy and biopsy. This test examines the esophagus and stomach using a thin, lighted instrument called a gastroscope, which is passed through the mouth down to the stomach. Through the gastroscope, the doctor can look directly at the inside of the stomach. If an abnormal area is found, the doctor will remove some tissue for examination (biopsy). A biopsy is the only sure way to diagnose cancer. Gastroscopy and biopsy are the best methods of identifying stomach cancer.

  • CT scan, a special type of x-ray that takes detailed images of the organs

  • Stage I: The cancer has spread all the way through the inner lining of the stomach wall into the middle layer, or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage II: The cancer has spread to the other layers of the stomach wall or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage III: The cancer has spread all the way through the stomach wall, into nearby lymph nodes, or into nearby organs.

  • <Stage IV: The cancer has metastasized to other sites in the body.

What are the stages of stomach cancer?

  • One of the biggest concerns about a cancer diagnosis is whether the cancer has spread (metastasized) beyond its original location. To determine this, the doctor assigns a number (I through IV) to the diagnosis. The higher the number, the more the cancer has spread throughout the body. This is called "staging."

    The stages of stomach cancer include the following:

  • Stage I: The cancer has spread all the way through the inner lining of the stomach wall into the middle layer, or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage II: The cancer has spread to the other layers of the stomach wall or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage III: The cancer has spread all the way through the stomach wall, into nearby lymph nodes, or into nearby organs.

 How is stomach cancer treated?

  • Stomach cancer may be treated with the following, alone or in combination:

  • Surgery, called gastrectomy, to remove all of the stomach (total gastrectomy) or part of the stomach, as well as some of the tissue surrounding the stomach. The doctor will also take biopsies of lymph nodes near the stomach to check for cancer cells. Lymphoma of the stomach is more frequently treated by gastrectomy than is adenocarcinoma. Only about one-third of stomach cancer cases can be treated and cured with surgery.

  • Chemotherapy (drugs that kill or slow the growth of rapidly multiplying cancer cells)

  • Radiation therapy (high levels of radiation to kill cancer cells or prevent them from multiplying, while minimizing damage to healthy cells)

One of the biggest concerns about a cancer diagnosis is whether the cancer has spread (metastasized) beyond its original location. To determine this, the doctor assigns a number (I through IV) to the diagnosis. The higher the number, the more the cancer has spread throughout the body. This is called "staging."

The stages of stomach cancer include the following:

  • Stage I: The cancer has spread all the way through the inner lining of the stomach wall into the middle layer, or to nearby lymph nodes.
  • Stage II: The cancer has spread to the other layers of the stomach wall or to nearby lymph nodes.
  • Stage III: The cancer has spread all the way through the stomach wall, into nearby lymph nodes, or into nearby organs.
  • <Stage IV: The cancer has metastasized to other sites in the body.

Stomach cancer may be treated with the following, alone or in combination:

  • Depending on the stage of the cancer, we may recommend a partial or total gastrectomy. With a partial gastrectomy distal/ lower   part of the stomach is removed. Nearby lymph nodes (called a lymphadenectomy) are also removed to determine if they contain cancer cells. Depending on the location of the tumor, we may also remove parts of other organs such as the small intestine or esophagus.

       

  • A total gastrectomy is a major operation if the cancer is located in the upper part of the stomach. In this procedure, entire stomach is removed along with  several lymph nodes and the esophagus is connected to the  jejunum ( small intestine) 

   

This allow the patients to eat and swallow normally.

  • Due to early recovery and less complications, we offer minimally invasive approach (Robotic and Laparoscopic) to all our patients, unless the anatomy is difficult or safety is compromised. 

  • Please call us today at (813) 879-5010 to schedule an appointment at a location nearest to you.

In addition to surgery, your medical oncologist may recommend treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation to improve your chances of a cure as well as to help you live longer and experience fewer symptoms of stomach cancer, if the disease has spread to the outer layer of the stomach wall, lymph nodes, or nearby organs. The treatment plan may include receiving chemotherapy before surgery (called neoadjuvant therapy) to first shrink a tumor, or after surgery (called adjuvant therapy) to eliminate any remaining cancer cells.

About Gastric Cancer

Gastric cancer occurs in the stomach. It is one of the very aggressive cancer and arises from the lining of the stomach. If diagnosed in early stage, this cancer has good prognosis. However at a later stage, the prognosis is poor.

Symptoms

Symptoms of stomach cancer:-

In the early stages, indigestion, nausea, feeling bloated, poor appetite are the vague symptoms. These symptoms mimick common diseases of the stomach like ulcer disease, reflux or gallbladder stones. As the result, these symptoms may be ignored by the patient for a long time and may not seek medical attention.. As the cancer grows and may spread, patients may develop symptoms like abdominal pain unrelieved by pain medications, black stools or bright bleeding noticed in the stool, vomiting blood ( hemetemesis), weight loss, fatigues relatred to anemia.

Diagnosis

Besides consultation with our Surgeons, gastroenterologist, following are the list of tests which may help with the diagnosis of the gastric cancer.

  • Blood tests, including blood chemistry (which looks for disease-causing substances in the blood) and complete blood count (to determine the number of red blood cells)

  • Upper GI series. These are X-rays of the esophagus and stomach (the upper gastrointestinal, or GI tract), taken after the patient drinks a barium solution. The barium outlines the stomach on the X-ray, helping the doctor find tumors or other abnormal areas.

  • Fecal occult blood test to look for blood in the stool

  • Gastroscopy and biopsy. This test examines the esophagus and stomach using a thin, lighted instrument called a gastroscope, which is passed through the mouth down to the stomach. Through the gastroscope, the doctor can look directly at the inside of the stomach. If an abnormal area is found, the doctor will remove some tissue for examination (biopsy). A biopsy is the only sure way to diagnose cancer. Gastroscopy and biopsy are the best methods of identifying stomach cancer.

  • CT scan, a special type of x-ray that takes detailed images of the organs

  • Stage I: The cancer has spread all the way through the inner lining of the stomach wall into the middle layer, or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage II: The cancer has spread to the other layers of the stomach wall or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage III: The cancer has spread all the way through the stomach wall, into nearby lymph nodes, or into nearby organs.

  • <Stage IV: The cancer has metastasized to other sites in the body.

What are the stages of stomach cancer?

  • One of the biggest concerns about a cancer diagnosis is whether the cancer has spread (metastasized) beyond its original location. To determine this, the doctor assigns a number (I through IV) to the diagnosis. The higher the number, the more the cancer has spread throughout the body. This is called "staging."

    The stages of stomach cancer include the following:

  • Stage I: The cancer has spread all the way through the inner lining of the stomach wall into the middle layer, or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage II: The cancer has spread to the other layers of the stomach wall or to nearby lymph nodes.

  • Stage III: The cancer has spread all the way through the stomach wall, into nearby lymph nodes, or into nearby organs.

 How is stomach cancer treated?

  • Stomach cancer may be treated with the following, alone or in combination:

  • Surgery, called gastrectomy, to remove all of the stomach (total gastrectomy) or part of the stomach, as well as some of the tissue surrounding the stomach. The doctor will also take biopsies of lymph nodes near the stomach to check for cancer cells. Lymphoma of the stomach is more frequently treated by gastrectomy than is adenocarcinoma. Only about one-third of stomach cancer cases can be treated and cured with surgery.

  • Chemotherapy (drugs that kill or slow the growth of rapidly multiplying cancer cells)

  • Radiation therapy (high levels of radiation to kill cancer cells or prevent them from multiplying, while minimizing damage to healthy cells)

Stages

One of the biggest concerns about a cancer diagnosis is whether the cancer has spread (metastasized) beyond its original location. To determine this, the doctor assigns a number (I through IV) to the diagnosis. The higher the number, the more the cancer has spread throughout the body. This is called "staging."

The stages of stomach cancer include the following:

  • Stage I: The cancer has spread all the way through the inner lining of the stomach wall into the middle layer, or to nearby lymph nodes.
  • Stage II: The cancer has spread to the other layers of the stomach wall or to nearby lymph nodes.
  • Stage III: The cancer has spread all the way through the stomach wall, into nearby lymph nodes, or into nearby organs.
  • <Stage IV: The cancer has metastasized to other sites in the body.

Treatment

Stomach cancer may be treated with the following, alone or in combination:

  • Depending on the stage of the cancer, we may recommend a partial or total gastrectomy. With a partial gastrectomy distal/ lower   part of the stomach is removed. Nearby lymph nodes (called a lymphadenectomy) are also removed to determine if they contain cancer cells. Depending on the location of the tumor, we may also remove parts of other organs such as the small intestine or esophagus.

       

  • A total gastrectomy is a major operation if the cancer is located in the upper part of the stomach. In this procedure, entire stomach is removed along with  several lymph nodes and the esophagus is connected to the  jejunum ( small intestine) 

   

This allow the patients to eat and swallow normally.

  • Due to early recovery and less complications, we offer minimally invasive approach (Robotic and Laparoscopic) to all our patients, unless the anatomy is difficult or safety is compromised. 

  • Please call us today at (813) 879-5010 to schedule an appointment at a location nearest to you.

Chemotherapy

In addition to surgery, your medical oncologist may recommend treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation to improve your chances of a cure as well as to help you live longer and experience fewer symptoms of stomach cancer, if the disease has spread to the outer layer of the stomach wall, lymph nodes, or nearby organs. The treatment plan may include receiving chemotherapy before surgery (called neoadjuvant therapy) to first shrink a tumor, or after surgery (called adjuvant therapy) to eliminate any remaining cancer cells.